When stem cell therapy works and does not work for your knee pain

Ross Hauser, MD, Danielle R. Steilen-Matias, MMS, PA-C

Why stem cell therapy did not or will not work for your knee pain

If you are reading this article it is very likely that you are exploring stem cell therapy for your degenerative knee condition or for the knee problems or surgical recommendations of knee replacement for a loved one. Either you or your loved one is in a lot of pain now and maybe right now is not the right time to get a knee replacement.

When opting for regenerative medicine injections, providers and the patients have to have a realistic idea of just how effective or non-effective these treatments can be. For some patients stem cell injections can be of great benefit in helping prevent or delay the need, long-term, for knee replacement surgery. For others, stem cell therapy results will be disappointing and non-effective. So how do you know?

Video: What type of treatment do I need? Is Stem Cell Therapy one of them?

At our center, while we do offer stem cell therapy, it is rare that we will use it. We feel based on more than 28 years of experience that we can achieve similar if not better and more stable results using Prolotherapy (dextrose injections) and varying strength Platelet Rich Plasma injections. This is explained in the video below, when do we use stem cell therapy, PRP, or Prolotherapy injections.

As it is also likely that you are searching out the different types of knee injections that may help you, we have a very extensive article What are the different types of knee injections for bone on bone knee.

In this article, we present a lot of research on

Realistic assessments of a good candidate and bad candidate for stem cell therapy

Perhaps the number one reason that stem cell therapy will not help your knee pain is if you have no remaining range of motion. If your knee is fused, cannot bend, is stuck in a bent in or bent out position, and held in place by bone spurs and osteoarthritic boney overgrowth. Stem cell therapy will likely not help you. If you have some range of motion, if you can walk with aid, can manage to get yourself in and out of a chair or car, and can walk steps, a consultation would be in order to further assess the success and amount of success this treatment may have for you.

In this video, Danielle R. Steilen-Matias, MMS, PA-C, offers a brief introduction to treatments. Explanatory and summary notes are below on the types of patients we see.

Prolotherapy? Platelet Rich Plasma Therapy? Stem Cell Therapy? This is among the most common questions that we get.

A major factor in determining which treatment to get is the extent of your injury and whether this is a recent injury or a problem with degenerative joint disease or degenerative arthritis.

General patient type 1: Younger patient, athlete, active, or with a physically demanding job. Recent injury, such as a sprain that has not healed all the way.


General patient type 2: Chronic problems from an “old” injury, such as a sprain that happened a few years ago. Injury “never really healed,” has progressively worsened. Causing pain, discomfort.


General patient type 3: Chronic long-term degenerative problems. Possibly in need of a joint replacement

Sometimes a patient will reach out to us and suggest, “I had one PRP injection it did not work, I definitely need stem cells.” That is not always the case. One injection of anything Prolotherapy, PRP, or stem cells, while possibly providing relief in many patients short-term, is typically not a long-term answer. This is explained below.


When someone sends us an email or comes into our office seeking answers as to why previous stem cell therapy treatments did not work for their knee pain, they want to know if a joint replacement is now their only option.

These emails will typically begin with:

Another answer is that for some people, knee degeneration is so far gone, is so beyond repair, that knee replacement may be the only option. In our clinic, we find this type of person to be the exception and not the rule.

Degenerative knee disease does not happen overnight. Healing degenerative knee disease with stem cell therapy cannot be expected to repair decades of wear and tear as a one-time injection treatment. Failure is an over expectation of treatment.

When you have knee joint erosion and advancing knee osteoarthritis, these conditions did not happen overnight. They took a long time to develop. When your doctor shows you your knee MRI and he/she shows you no joint space, bone spurs, degenerative soft tissue damage, these things developed over time. To have someone tell you that one injection of anything, more or less randomly given somewhere in the knee, will reverse all this damage, is an extraordinary claim that requires extraordinary evidence. That evidence is not there.

Slow degenerative disease requires slow, deliberate treatment to repair. Stem cell therapy is one treatment option. Knee replacement is another. Knee replacement is a slow methodical repair of the function of your knee requiring lengthy rehab.

If you put a patch on the hole, the patch will eventually wear away too

Stem cell therapy will often fail because stem cell clinicians think that if you injected the stem cells into the holes of the cartilage, they will instantly patch up the knee and the bone-on-bone situation will be gone. Maybe that will work in the short term but you still have a problem that the patch is going to be subjected to the same type of degenerative problems that caused your knee to go bone on bone in the first place. Single-injection, one-time stem cell therapy only tries to patch a hole in the cartilage. The comprehensive stem cell treatment people should have explored seeks to patch a hole in cartilage and prevent it from returning by stabilizes the knee’s ligament and tendon support structure. That is done with Prolotherapy injections which we will now discuss.


Our published research on stem cell therapy combined with Prolotherapy

When we use bone marrow-derived stem cells and Prolotherapy together:

Our 2014 study in the journal Clinical Medicine Insights. Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders, (1) we examined 24 adult patients who had a diagnosis of radiographic osteoarthritis (this was degenerative knee disease which was seen and documented on an MRI) and had visited our chronic pain clinic in 2009 for Prolotherapy treatment to relieve their chronic pain. The results of our study have shown that a combined bone marrow stem cell Prolotherapy treatment regimen of injections to painful sites in and around the knee provided pain relief and improved joint function.

Paving the way for stem cell therapy success with Prolotherapy treatments

In the simplest terms, Prolotherapy is the injection of sugar water into a damaged joint. Prolotherapy injections work to heal damaged joints by stimulating nature’s healing and regenerative processes through inflammation. Prolotherapy does so by causing a controlled, specifically targeted inflammation that helps grow new ligament and tendon tissue.

Stem cell therapy is an injection of your own harvested stem cells. Stem cell therapy is typically utilized when we need to “patch” holes in cartilage and stimulate bone. We explore this option in patients when there is more advanced osteoarthritis and a recommendation for a joint replacement has been made or suggested. A realistic expectation of treatment success should be made during discussions with the provider’s office prior to the consultation.

Here are the case histories of this study:

The patient is a 69-year-old male presented with pain in both knees.

Case history 1

The patient is a 56-year-old male presented with pain in both knees.

Case history 2

The patient is a 69-year-old female with pain in both knees.

Case history 3


Questions about our treatments?

We hope you found this article informative and it helped answer many of the questions you may have surrounding these various injection treatments. Do you want to ask about treatment for your knees? If you have questions and want to know how we may be able to help you, please contact us and get help and information from our Caring Medical staff.

This is a picture of Ross Hauser, MD, Danielle Steilen-Matias, PA-C, Brian Hutcheson, DC.

Brian Hutcheson, DC | Ross Hauser, MD | Danielle Steilen-Matias, PA-C

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References:

1 Hauser RA, Orlofsky A. Regenerative injection therapy with whole bone marrow aspirate for degenerative joint disease: a case series. Clinical Medicine Insights: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders. 2013 Jan;6:CMAMD-S10951. [Google Scholar]

This article was updated on January 21, 2021

 

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